Tighten Your Grip, and Star Systems Will Slip Through Your Fingers

Princess Leia had a point when she told Tarkin to back off with the Death Star. This week, I shared a report that moves managers to adopt a remote mindset. While frequent checkins are good, you shouldn’t overdo it.

To find the frequency, just ask your people what works best based on their personal style. Micromanaging won’t do you any favors, and too much distance will rob you of the moments critical to success. HBR’s Jesse Sostrin says asking not only informs a baseline, “but also gives them autonomy in how the delegated work will move forward.”

Be mindful and listen. “Have an eye for detail, but don’t nitpick or act like you know everything—your coworkers won’t like feeling stifled.” Still having trouble? Read up on F2F vs. asynchronous communication, and check your grip. [ source ]

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Good Managers Adopt a Remote Mindset

A new study shows differences between remote and onsite workers, including division of labor, perceptions of coworkers, and experiences with tech. Remote workers put in longer hours due to a lack of work-life balance. Yet, 75% of those onsite would seek a remote option.

Effectively managing remote workers depends on addressing their needs, and listening and communicating well. Successful managers check in frequently and ask about workload, and meet face-to-face at least once a month for team-building. [ source ]

It’s Time to Ditch the Work Silos—for Real

My latest for LinkedIn Pulse uses Daniel Pink’s “Motivation 3.0” (autonomy, mastery and purpose) to promote collaboration. Diversifying can move you toward a more collaborative and service-oriented approach to engagement.

At TechSoup, I led a team of experts to position the forum as a global resource for nonprofits, as well as a content partner for Microsoft, Adobe, Cisco and Box. The spirit of collaboration was baked into everything we did. Published via LinkedIn on Nov 2, 2017.

Read online http://bit.ly/ditch-the-work-silos-linkedin-pulse